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Lancet. 1997 Mar 29;349(9056):911-4.

9-year HIV-2-associated mortality in an urban community in Bissau, west Africa.

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1
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Community studies with 1-3 years of follow-up have reported four to five times higher mortality in HIV-2-infected than in uninfected adults. In a cohort study of HIV-1, an increasing difference in mortality rates of HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals is expected over time, because of rising mortality with advancing HIV-1 infection. We therefore investigated long-term survival of HIV-2-infected adults.

METHODS:

Adults enrolled in 1987 in a community study of HIV-2 infection in Guinea-Bissau were followed up with serological surveys in 1989 and 1992. Survival was assessed in 1995, 9 years after enrollment.

FINDINGS:

The annual incidence of HIV-2 was 0.7% for adults and tended to be higher for older individuals than for participants aged 15-44 years (relative risk 3.21 [95% CI 0.91-11.37]). With control for age, HIV-2-infected adults had twice as high mortality as uninfected individuals (mortality ratio 2.32 [1.18-4.57]); the mortality ratio was highest in the first year of the study (4.50 [1.31-15.43]). The difference between infected and uninfected individuals was stronger for adults under 45 years of age (mortality ratio 4.72 [1.86-11.97]) than for older people (1.35 [0.51-3.56]). HIV-2-infected individuals living with an infected spouse had significantly higher mortality than HIV-2-infected individuals living with an uninfected spouse (p = 0.027).

INTERPRETATION:

HIV-2-associated mortality is not increasing with length of follow-up. Mortality in HIV-2-infected adults is only twice as high as that in uninfected individuals. In the majority of adults, HIV-2 has no effect on survival.

PIP:

While HIV-2 infection can lead to AIDS, it takes longer than HIV-1 to induce immunosuppression and AIDS, it is less transmissible, and it is associated with lower mortality than HIV-1 infection. 1329 people from among 100 houses in Guinea-Bissau participated in a 1987 study of HIV seroprevalence in their community. 8.9% of the family members older than age 14 years were infected with HIV-2, as well as 0.6% of the 677 children, but no one was infected with HIV-1. All subjects enrolled in the 1987 study over age 14 were followed up with serological surveys in 1989 and 1992, with their survival assessed in 1995. HIV-2 associated mortality did not increase over time and mortality in HIV-2-infected adults was only twice as high as that among uninfected individuals. In the majority of adults, HIV-2 has no effect upon survival. The difference in mortality between the infected and the uninfected was greater for adults under age 45 years than for older people. Furthermore, HIV-2-infected individuals living with an infected spouse had significantly higher mortality than those living with an uninfected spouse.

PMID:
9093252
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(96)04402-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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