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Annu Rev Physiol. 1997;59:365-93.

Specific, nongenomic actions of steroid hormones.

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1
Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty for Clinical Medicine at Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.

Abstract

Traditionally, steroid hormone action has been described as the modulation of nuclear transcription, thus triggering genomic events that are responsible for physiological effects. Despite early observations of rapid steroid effects that were incompatible with this theory, nongenomic steroid action has been widely recognized only recently. Evidence for these rapid effects is available for steroids of all clones and for a multitude of species and tissues. Examples of nongenomic steroid action include rapid aldosterone effects in lymphocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, vitamin D3 effects in epithelial cells, progesterone action in human sperm, neurosteroid effects on neuronal function, and vascular effects of estrogens. Mechanisms of action are being studied with regard to signal perception and transduction, and researchers have developed a patchy sketch of a membrane receptor-second messenger cascade similar to those involved in catecholamine and peptide hormone action. Many of these effects appear to involve phospholipase C, phosphoinositide turnover, intracellular pH and calcium, protein kinase C, and tyrosine kinases. The physiological and pathophysiological relevance of these effects is unclear, but rapid steroid effects on cardiovascular, central nervous, and reproductive functions may occur in vivo. The cloning of the cDNA for the first membrane receptor for steroids should be achieved in the near future, and the physiological and clinical relevance of these rapid steroid effects can then be established.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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