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Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1997 Mar;41(3):583-6.

In vivo efficacy of trovafloxacin (CP-99,217), a new quinolone, in experimental intra-abdominal abscesses caused by Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli.

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1
Department of Medicine, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California 90059, USA.

Abstract

The efficacy of trovafloxacin in treating Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli infections was investigated and compared to the efficacy of combined clindamycin and gentamicin therapy in an experimental model of intra-abdominal abscesses in rats. Rats were treated with different doses of CP-116,517-27, a parenteral prodrug of trovafloxacin. Response to treatment was evaluated by mortality rate and elimination of infection (cure rate). Mortality in the control group was 85.4%, whereas in rats treated with trovafloxacin, it was close to 0%. The highest cure rate (89.3%) resulted from the administration of 40 mg of CP-116,517-27 per kg of body weight three times a day (TID) for 10 days (equivalent to 18.15 mg of active drug trovafloxacin per rat per day). The therapeutic response with trovafloxacin was comparable to that of a combination therapy of clindamycin (75 mg/kg) plus gentamicin (20 mg/kg) TID (cure rate, 74%; mortality rate, 5%). The measured peak levels of trovafloxacin in serum and abscess pus were 2.6 +/- 0.3 and 5.2 micrograms/ml, respectively. The tumor necrosis factor alpha levels in the untreated animals were high compared to those for rats treated with trovafloxacin or clindamycin plus gentamicin. These results demonstrate that trovafloxacin as a single agent appears to be as successful as clindamycin plus gentamicin in the treatment of experimental intra-abdominal abscesses in rats.

PMID:
9055997
PMCID:
PMC163755
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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