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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1997 Mar 1;210(5):651-4.

Comparison of blood pressure measurements obtained in dogs by use of indirect oscillometry in a veterinary clinic versus at home.

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  • 1Madera Pet Hospital, Corte Madera, CA 94925, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare blood pressure and heart rate measurements performed in a veterinary clinic to similar measurements performed in a dog's home.

DESIGN:

Prospective study.

ANIMALS:

14 client-owned, clinically normal dogs.

PROCEDURE:

Sequential blood pressure and heart rate measurements were recorded from the metatarsus and metacarpus of conscious dogs by indirect oscillometry. Measurements were performed in the dogs' homes and were repeated in a veterinary clinic. Blood pressures and heart rate were derived from 7 serial estimates over 8 to 10 minutes. Statistical differences between the home and clinic and between recording sites were calculated.

RESULTS:

Systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure and heart rate measurements obtained from the metatarsus and metacarpus in the dogs' homes were significantly lower than measurements from the metatarsus in the clinic, but were similar to measurements from the metacarpus in the clinic. Significant differences were not found between blood pressure measurements from the metatarsus and metacarpus in the dogs' homes, but systolic and mean blood pressure and heart rate measurements from the metacarpus in the clinic were significantly lower than measurements from the metatarsus. Whereas all dogs had normal blood pressure in their homes, 5 of 14 dogs had transient hypertension (systolic pressure > 165 mm of Hg or diastolic pressure > 95 mm of Hg) in the clinic.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:

Blood pressure and heart rate measurements obtained in the clinic initially overestimate comparable measurements in a dog's home. The differences are best explained by transient autonomic responses to the stress of the clinic. Blood pressure must be measured by use of standardized techniques on dogs acclimated to the clinic environment.

PMID:
9054993
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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