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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1997 Mar 4;94(5):1896-901.

Misfolded major histocompatibility complex class I heavy chains are translocated into the cytoplasm and degraded by the proteasome.

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1
Section of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.

Abstract

N-acetyl-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-norleucinal (LLnL), which reversibly inhibits the proteasome in addition to other proteases, and a more specific irreversible inhibitor of the proteasome, lactacystin, were found to cause the accumulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I heavy chains in the cytosol of the beta2-microglobulin-deficient cell line Daudi and the TAP-deficient cell line .174. These cell lines, which are severely impaired in their ability to fold MHC class I heavy chain, showed an accumulation of soluble class I heavy chains at different rates over a period of hours in the presence of LLnL. The accumulation of soluble class I heavy chains in the presence of either LLnL or lactacystin was easily revealed in Daudi and .174 but almost undetectable in a Daudi transfectant expressing beta2-microglobulin and in 45.1, the wild-type parent of .174. The soluble class I heavy chain was also found to be devoid of its N-linked glycan and to be located in the cytosol. When the gene for ICP47, a herpes simplex virus protein that blocks the translocation of peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum, was transfected into 45.1, a similar accumulation of soluble MHC class I heavy chain was detectable. These data suggest that in cells where the MHC class I molecule is unable to assemble properly, the misfolded heavy chain is removed from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, deglycosylated, and degraded by the proteasome.

PMID:
9050876
PMCID:
PMC20014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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