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Acta Neuropathol. 1997 Feb;93(2):118-28.

Neuropathology and blood flow of nerve, spinal roots and dorsal root ganglia in longstanding diabetic rats.

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1
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Abstract

Vascular perfusion and neuropathologic evaluation of the lumbar spinal roots and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were studied in rats with longstanding (duration 12-15 months) streptozotocin-induced diabetes and age- and sex-matched control rats. We also undertook nerve conduction studies including F-wave recordings and measured blood flow in sciatic nerve, DRG, and superior cervical ganglion (SCG). Light microscopically, changes of the myelin sheath in the dorsal and ventral roots and vacuolated cells in the DRG were the major findings, being significantly higher in diabetic rats than in control rats. The effects of the diabetic state on myelin splitting were greater in the dorsal than ventral roots. Electron microscopic studies revealed a gradation of changes in myelin from mild separation to severe ballooning of myelin with relative axonal sparing. DRG cells showed vacuoles of all sizes with cristae-like residues, suggestive of mitochondria. These findings suggest that diabetes mellitus has a dual effect: it accelerates the normal age-related degenerative changes in the spinal roots and DRG, and it also has a selective effect on the sensory neuron. Nerve conduction studies showed markedly reduced conduction velocities in the distal nerve segments and prolonged F-wave latency and proximal conduction time despite the shorter conduction pathway in diabetic rats. Blood flow, which was measured using iodo[14C]antipyrine autoradiography, was significantly reduced in the sciatic nerves, DRG, and SCG of diabetic rats. We suggest that the combination of hyperglycemia and ischemia results in oxidative-stress and a predominantly sensory neuropathy.

PMID:
9039458
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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