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Ophthalmic Surg Lasers. 1997 Jan;28(1):30-6.

Ocular hypertension after cataract surgery: a comparison of three surgical techniques and two viscoelastics.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Cristóbal Garrigosa Memorial, Hospital de l'Esperança i del Mdr, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the incidence and course of ocular hypertension after cataract surgery using two different viscoelastics and three different surgical techniques.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Thirty-six patients who had undergone extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE), 22 who had undergone phacoemulsification (PHACO), and 16 who had undergone manual nucleofragmentation (MNF) were randomized to receive either a low-viscosity viscoelastic (LVV) or a high-viscosity viscoelastic (HVV) intraoperatively. Post-operative evaluation included anamnesis, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, and slit-lamp examination at 3, 6, 24, and 72 hours and 7 days.

RESULTS:

The incidence of increased IOP over baseline after cataract surgery was 74.3%. The study of both viscoelastics revealed a trend for higher IOP during the first 24 hours for patients who received HVV (P < .05). Greater differences were observed when comparing surgical techniques. Small-incision techniques showed higher mean postoperative IOPs, and more severe hypertensions (PHACO 5/22 [22.7%] and MNF 2/16 [12.5%] vs ECCE 3/36 [8.3%]) (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Ocular hypertension is a frequent postoperative complication. It is slightly more common when using HVV. Small-incision techniques show higher mean postoperative IOPs and more severe hypertensions.

PMID:
9031302
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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