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Health Psychol. 1997 Jan;16(1):73-86.

Correlates of psychologic distress in colorectal cancer patients undergoing genetic testing for hereditary colon cancer.

Author information

1
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health 77225, USA. svernon@uthsph.sph.uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

In this article the authors describe the demographic and psychosocial correlates of 2 measures of psychologic distress among 200 colorectal cancer patients undergoing genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer. The prevalence of symptoms of depression on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale was 24%. In multivariate analysis, female sex, less formal education, fewer sources of social contacts, and less satisfaction with them were associated with high scores on the CES-D Scale. Characteristics associated with high scores on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were younger age, less formal education, non-White race, local-regional stage of disease, fewer social contacts, and less satisfaction with them. Information on psychosocial correlates of psychologic distress may prove useful in guiding genetic counseling sessions, in identifying subgroups that need more intensive follow-up, and in developing interventions to facilitate adjustment to genetic test results.

PMID:
9028817
DOI:
10.1037//0278-6133.16.1.73
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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