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Chest. 1997 Jan;111(1):170-3.

High prevalence of allergic sensitization in children with habitual snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether allergic sensitization occurs frequently in children with habitual snoring and whether allergy predicts the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in snoring children.

DESIGN:

Prospective study of 39 children with habitual snoring who were referred for polysomnography.

SETTING:

Pediatric pulmonary sleep disorders clinic in a tertiary referral center.

MEASUREMENTS:

Subjects underwent a complete history and physical examination. To assess for the presence of allergic sensitization, a multiantigen radioallergosorbent test (RAST) was performed on serum samples. Subjects then underwent nocturnal polysomnography to determine the presence and severity of OSAS.

RESULTS:

Fourteen subjects (36%) demonstrated sensitivity to allergens; this is higher than expected for the general pediatric population. The frequency of OSAS was increased in subjects with positive RAST results compared to those with negative RAST results (57% vs 40%; chi 2 = 9.11; p < 0.01).

CONCLUSION:

Allergy is frequently present in pediatric patients with habitual snoring. Furthermore, the presence of allergy is associated with an increased risk of OSAS in this population.

PMID:
8996012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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