Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1997 Jan 1;210(1):87-92.

Survey of diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine and the American College of Veterinary Surgeons regarding clinical aspects and treatment of endotoxemia in horses.

Author information

  • 1Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins 80523, USA.

Abstract

A questionnaire designed to elicit information concerning prevalence, underlying causes, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and complications of endotoxemia in horses was mailed to diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine and the American College of Veterinary Surgeons who identified themselves as equine practitioners. Gastrointestinal tract compromise, conditions associated with foaling, and grain overload were reported to be the most common clinical conditions that led to endotoxemia. Most of the respondents diagnosed endotoxemia on the basis of the following clinical and laboratory findings: neutropenia, leukopenia, hyperemic mucous membranes, tachycardia, and fever. Treatments used to attempt to prevent development of endotoxemia or to treat horses with endotoxemia included i.v. fluids and administration of broad-spectrum antimicrobials and flunixin meglumine.

PMID:
8977655
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center