Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMJ. 1996 Dec 7;313(7070):1450-3.

The anti-tobacco campaign of the Nazis: a little known aspect of public health in Germany, 1933-45.

Author information

1
Department of History, Pennsylvania State University, University Park 16802, USA.

Abstract

Historians and epidemiologists have only recently begun to explore the Nazi anti-tobacco movement. Germany had the world's strongest antismoking movement in the 1930s and early 1940s, encompassing bans on smoking in public spaces, bans on advertising, restrictions on tobacco rations for women, and the world's most refined tobacco epidemiology, linking tobacco use with the already evident epidemic of lung cancer. The anti-tobacco campaign must be understood against the backdrop of the Nazi quest for racial and bodily purity, which also motivated many other public health efforts of the era.

PMID:
8973234
PMCID:
PMC2352989
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.313.7070.1450
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center