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Arthritis Care Res. 1996 Apr;9(2):89-96.

Pain coping strategies in children with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome: correlation with pain, physical function, and psychological distress.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to describe the coping strategies used by children with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS), and 2) to examine how pain coping relates to measures of pain, disability/function, psychological distress, and pain behavior.

METHODS:

Sixteen children with JPFS completed the Child Version of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ-C), the visual analog scale for pain, the McGill Pain Questionnaire, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire modified for children, the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales 2, and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Subjects also also underwent pain behavior observation. Pearson's product moment correlations were conducted to examine the relationship of coping to measures of pain and disability.

RESULTS:

The Pain Control and Rational Thinking composite factor score on the CSQ-C correlated with measures of pain severity, functional disability, and psychological distress. Results supported the internal reliability of the CSQ-C in assessing pain coping.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that the CSQ-C may provide a reliable measure for assessing variations in pain coping in JPFS patients. Behavioral interventions aimed at increasing the perception of pain control may be beneficial in treating JPFS.

PMID:
8970266
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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