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J Refract Surg. 1996 Jan-Feb;12(1):68-76.

Arcuate transverse keratotomy for astigmatism followed by subsequent radial or transverse keratotomy. ARC-T Study Group. Astigmatism Reduction Clinical Trial.

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1
Cornea Research Foundation of America, Indianapolis, Ind, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We studied the safety and efficacy of arcuate transverse keratotomy performed for the primary correction of naturally occurring corneal astigmatism.

METHODS:

A multicenter, prospective evaluation of one-stage arcuate transverse keratotomy was conducted in 160 eyes with 1.00 to 6.00 diopters (D) of naturally occurring astigmatism. Vector analysis was used. After 1 month, those eyes that needed further refractive surgery received radial keratotomy for myopia and second-stage arcuate transverse keratotomy for residual astigmatism.

RESULTS:

Mean preoperative refractive cylinder was 2.80 D. At 1 month, the vector-corrected change was 2.30 D. Eighty-eight (61%) eyes had at least 1.00 D of residual refractive cylinder and 24 (17%) had at least 2.00 D. Eyes undergoing a second surgery averaged 1.60 D of vector-corrected effect, for a total effect of 2.90 D from both surgeries, indicating the astigmatic refractive effects were not additive. Eyes that had radial keratotomy alone as the second surgery demonstrated a similar change in refractive cylinder as eyes that had both radial and transverse keratotomies. Two eyes lost two lines of spectacle-corrected visual acuity, 29 eyes lost one line, 84 showed no change, and 26 eyes improved one line.

CONCLUSION:

Arcuate transverse keratotomy reduced refractive astigmatism. Both overcorrection and undercorrection were common. Complications were infrequent but occasionally caused significant irregular astigmatism. Arcuate transverse keratotomy appears to be a safe procedure with few complications.

PMID:
8963820
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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