Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Mol Chem Neuropathol. 1996 Feb;27(2):195-210.

Synaptotagmin, a synaptic vesicle protein, is present in human cerebrospinal fluid: a new biochemical marker for synaptic pathology in Alzheimer disease?

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Göteborg University, Sweden.

Abstract

Using a novel approach, including affinity chromatography, reversed-phase chromatography, and chemiluminescence immunoblotting, we have for the first time been able to demonstrate one of the small synaptic vesicle proteins, synaptotagmin I, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Two other small synaptic vesicle proteins, rab3a and synaptophysin, were not detectable. The approximate molecular weight of CSF-synaptotagmin was 65 kDa, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Further characterization of CSF synaptotagmin by high-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) showed a single peak. These findings support that the whole synaptotagmin molecule is present in CSF, without significant proteolytic degradation. After high-speed centrifugation of CSF, synaptotagmin was exclusively found in the supernatant, suggesting that synaptotagmin is present in CSF as a free protein, and not as a constituent of synaptic vesicles. In a preliminary study, we found a marked reduction of CSF synaptotagmin in patients with early onset Alzheimer disease (EAD) as compared with age-matched healthy individuals. To elucidate the biological relevance of this finding, we also quantified synaptotagmin in brain tissue. A marked reduction in synaptotagmin was found both in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of EAD, suggesting that a decrease in synaptotagmin in the brain is followed by a concomitant decrease in the CSF. Analysis of CSF synaptotagmin might provide a tool to study synaptic function and pathology in the human brain.

PMID:
8962603
DOI:
10.1007/BF02815094
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center