Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biochem Pharmacol. 1996 Dec 24;52(12):1883-93.

Induction of cytochrome P4501A1 by photooxidized tryptophan in Hepa lclc7 cells.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, University of California at Irvine 92697, USA.

Abstract

Mouse hepatoma Hepa-lclc7 (Hepa-1) cells were cultivated in the presence of UV-irradiated amino acids. The results demonstrated that all of the amino acids tested, UV-oxidized tryptophan caused the highest induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity compared with the controls (P < 0.01). The induction of EROD activity by oxidized tryptophan was dose dependent, and maximal induction was obtained at 12 hr after administration. Studies with various Hepa-1 mutants, which are defective in either the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor or Ah receptor nuclear translocator protein, indicated that the induction of EROD activity by oxidized tryptophan occurs through the Ah receptor. Gel mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts of Hepa-1 cells revealed that oxidized products of tryptophan can induce both Ah receptor transformation and binding of the liganded Ah receptor complex to its specific DNA recognition site. CYP1A1 mRNA, quantified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and CYP1A1 protein were induced markedly in the oxidized tryptophan group compared with the controls. Injection of isolated oxidized tryptophan products into adult male rats caused significant induction of EROD activity in the pulmonary and hepatic microsomes compared with the controls (P < 0.01). These results demonstrated that oxidized tryptophan induces Ah receptor activation and binding of the liganded Ah receptor complex to its specific DNA recognition site, thereby initiating transcription and translation of the CYP1A1 gene with concomitant increase of EROD activity in Hepa-1 cells. Induction of EROD activity in the liver and lungs after injection of isolated oxidized tryptophan products into rats suggests that a similar mechanism may be operative in vivo.

PMID:
8951347
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center