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Ophthalmology. 1996 Nov;103(11):1798-803.

Open-globe injury. Update on types of injuries and visual results.

Author information

1
Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21287-9228, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of the study is to evaluate a recent series of patients who presented with open-globe injuries and to compare this series with a previous series collected at the authors' institution to determine whether prognostic factors or visual outcomes have changed.

METHODS:

A retrospective review of 290 eyes of consecutive patients who presented to the Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute with open-globe injuries between December 1985 and January 1993 (group B) was compared with a series of 476 eyes with open-globe injury treated and evaluated at this institute between January 1970 and December 1981 (group A). For comparison, the outcomes evaluated included rates of enucleation and final visual acuity.

RESULTS:

Several factors identified previously in group A to correlate with visual outcomes also were found to correlate significantly (P < 0.001) with visual outcome in group B, including: (1) type of injury, (2) location and extent of injury, (3) initial visual acuity, (4) presence of an afferent pupillary defect, (5) lenticular involvement, (6) vitreous hemorrhage, and (7) type of intraocular foreign body. Overall visual outcomes differed significantly between the groups (P = 0.02). The incidence of enucleation was lower in group B (24%) than in group A (30%). However, the percentage of patients who achieved ambulatory visual acuity (5/200) or better was similar in both groups (57%, group A versus 55%, group B).

CONCLUSION:

Prognostic factors identified previously proved valid in this recent series. Visual outcomes have improved at this institution in the last 20 years for patients with severe ocular trauma, although visual potential for these patients is still limited.

PMID:
8942873
DOI:
10.1016/s0161-6420(96)30424-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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