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BMJ. 1996 Nov 16;313(7067):1233-5.

Avian exposure and risk of lung cancer in women in Missouri: population based case-control study.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockvilie, MD 20852, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association, previously reported in three European studies, between ownership of pet birds and the risk of lung cancer.

DESIGN:

A population based case-control study with a structured questionnaire administered by telephone.

SETTING:

Missouri, a midwestern state in the United States with a population of about 5 million.

SUBJECTS:

All newly diagnosed cases of primary lung cancer in women aged 30-84 years in Missouri from 1 January 1993 to 31 January 1994 reported to the state cancer registry were invited to participate (n = 652); and 629 population based controls.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Odds ratios were computed in relation to whether or not the study subject ever kept pet birds, the type of bird kept, and several measures of intensity or duration of exposure. Odds ratios were adjusted for smoking.

RESULTS:

The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for the development of lung cancer associated with keeping pet birds was 0.84 (0.65 to 1.09). The results were similar for the type of pet bird kept, the number of birds kept, the location of the bird in the house, and the duration of ownership.

CONCLUSION:

The keeping of pet birds carries no excess risk for the development of lung cancer.

Comment in

PMID:
8939111
PMCID:
PMC2352575
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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