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Aust Vet J. 1996 Oct;74(4):305-8.

A longitudinal study of veterinary students and recent graduates. 4. Gender issues.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomical Sciences, University of Queensland. t.heath@mailbox.uq.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study differences in experiences, attitudes and opinions between female and male veterinary students and recent graduates.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal study.

POPULATION:

Students-77 males and 77 females-who began studying veterinary science at The University of Queensland in 1985 and 1986.

PROCEDURE:

Questionnaires were completed in the first and fifth year of the course, and in the second year after graduation. The data were analysed using the SAS System for Windows.

RESULTS:

Females decided to study veterinary science at a younger age than males and were more influenced by 'a love of animals', the image of veterinarians as portrayed on television, an interest in living things and in the scientific study of disease. Males were more influenced than females in aspects of the workplace: bosses and money. There were no gender differences in their background in relation to farms, or to animals, or in their career plans. However females when in first year expected a lower initial income than males; an expectation that was realised in the first year after graduation. As first year students and also as veterinarians, females had stronger views than males on animal welfare issues, and also felt that the veterinary profession had a lower status relative to other professions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Significant differences in attitudes and experiences exist between males and females entering the veterinary profession. The situation of females in relation to income and status is consistent with that in other professions, where females have been disadvantaged compared with males.

PMID:
8937673
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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