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J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1996 Nov;35(11):1485-90.

A naturalistic assessment of protriptyline for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

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1
Pediatric Psychopharmacology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the potential benefit of the tricyclic antidepressant, protriptyline, in the treatment of children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

METHOD:

All clinic patients in an outpatient pediatric psychopharmacology unit treated with protriptyline for ADHD were monitored for response to treatment. Thirteen subjects (11 male, 2 female) were treated naturalistically with protriptyline for ADHD and were administered the ADHD Symptom Rating Scale and Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S) and improvement (CGI-I) at baseline and while taking medication. All patients had failed to respond to at least one previous medication trial, and 46% had psychiatric comorbidity.

RESULTS:

Patients received an average protriptyline dose of 17 mg (range 5 to 30 mg) for 11.5 +/- 6.8 weeks. Of the 11 patients who continued to take protriptyline for at least 4 weeks, there was a modest reduction in the ADHD symptom checklist (p < .004) and the CGI-S (p = .032). However, using a predefined criteria of response, only 45% of patients were considered positive responders. Adverse effects were prominent, with 46% of patients reporting clinically significant problems and 38% of patients discontinuing treatment because of intolerable side effects.

CONCLUSION:

These findings do not support the clinical utility of protriptyline in the routine management of complex cases of ADHD in children and adolescents. However, the usefulness in noncomorbid, medication-naive ADHD individuals remains unclear.

PMID:
8936915
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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