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Neuroscience. 1996 Nov;75(2):535-42.

Prepulse inhibition and latent inhibition: the role of dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex.

Abstract

The prefrontal cortex has often been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Schizophrenic patients are known to suffer from certain information processing deficits, which can be detected, among others, in the prepulse inhibition and the latent inhibition paradigm. The present study was designed to investigate the role of dopamine receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex in prepulse inhibition and latent inhibition. The results show that the local application of the selective antagonist of the dopamine D1-like receptor family, SCH 39166, into the medial prefrontal cortex dose-dependently reduced prepulse inhibition. Likewise, the selective antagonist of the dopamine D2-like receptor family, sulpiride, injected into the medial prefrontal cortex dose-dependently reduced prepulse inhibition. Neither of these antagonists, however, influenced latent inhibition as measured with the conditioned taste aversion paradigm. These data further indicate that the neuronal substrates of latent inhibition and prepulse inhibition are clearly different. Since the prefrontal cortex is intimately related to subcortical dopamine, the possible differential involvement of subcortical dopaminergic terminal fields in prepulse inhibition and latent inhibition is discussed.

PMID:
8931016
DOI:
10.1016/0306-4522(96)00307-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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