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J Cancer Educ. 1995 Winter;10(4):213-6.

Breast cancer screening: racial/ethnic differences in behaviors and beliefs.

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1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Abstract

Racial/ethnic differences in breast cancer screening behaviors and beliefs were examined in 259 asymptomatic women, 50 years old or older, who participated in a no-cost worksite breast cancer screening program. Hispanics were more likely than African Americans to report having had mammography in the past year. Caucasians and Hispanics were more likely than African Americans to report having had a clinical breast examination in the past year. African Americans to report having had a clinical breast examination in the past year. African Americans and Hispanics were more likely to practice monthly breast self-examination than were Caucasians. African Americans were more likely to report cancer-related fears and worries as barriers to mammography, whereas Caucasians were more likely to report being too busy, inconvenience, and procrastination as barriers. African Americans also were more likely to evaluate their physicians and other health professionals positively than were Caucasians. These results suggest a need to make a special effort to address cancer-related fears as barriers to screening among African Americans, and time-related barriers to screening among Caucasians.

PMID:
8924397
DOI:
10.1080/08858199509528376
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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