Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1996 Nov 15;209(10):1746-9.

Case-control study of risk factors for the development of laminitis in the contralateral limb in Equidae with unilateral lameness.

Author information

1
Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843-4475, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify risk factors associated with development of laminitis of the supporting limb in Equidae with unilateral laminitis and to determine the radiographic appearance of this type of laminitis.

DESIGN:

Retrospective analysis of medical records.

ANIMALS:

20 Equidae with unilateral lameness that developed laminitis of the contralateral limb.

PROCEDURE:

Case animals were compared with matched and unmatched populations of control animals that did not develop contralateral limb laminitis. Lateromedial radiographic projections of affected feet were evaluated for evidence of laminitis.

RESULTS:

Body weight of case animals was not significantly different from that of control animals, but number of days that control animals were lame prior to recovery was significantly less than number of days that case animals were lame prior to the onset of laminitis. Lateromedial radiographic projections of the foot of the support limb were available for 16 of the 20 case animals. For all 16, thickness of the soft tissue dorsal to the distal phalanx was > 29% of the palmar cortical length of the distal phalanx, but only 1 had evidence of rotation of the distal phalanx. The proportion of case animals that were euthanatized was significantly greater than the proportion of control animals that were euthanatized.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:

Duration of lameness, but not body weight, was a risk factor for development of laminitis in the contralateral limb in Equidae with unilateral lameness, and animals that developed this complication were more likely to be euthanatized than were animals that did not.

PMID:
8921034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center