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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1996 Oct;154(4 Pt 1):1034-8.

Six-month supervised intermittent tuberculosis therapy in Haitian patients with and without HIV infection.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

We enrolled 427 consecutive patients with tuberculosis diagnosed in Cité Soleil, Haiti in a trial of short-course intermittent therapy. All patients received supervised therapy with isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol thrice weekly for 8 wk, followed by isoniazid and rifampin thrice weekly for 18 wk. At entry, the 177 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients (42%) were found significantly more likely to have extrapulmonary tuberculosis and negative tuberculin skin tests (p < 0.05). Treatment was well tolerated by both groups of patients, and adherence to the treatment regimen was over 90%. Among patients with pulmonary or intrathoracic tuberculosis, 9% of HIV-seropositive and 1% of HIV-seronegative patients died during therapy (p < 0.001), whereas 81% and 87%, respectively, of those in the two groups were cured. Relapses occurred in 5.4% of HIV-seropositive and 2.8% of HIV-seronegative patients who completed treatment (p = 0.36). Survival after tuberculosis was poorer in HIV-seropositive patients, whose probability of dying was 33% at 18 mo after diagnosis as compared with 3% for HIV-seronegative patients (p < 0.001). HIV-seropositive patients who died had significantly lower median CD4 lymphocyte counts than did HIV-seropositive patients who survived (p < 0.001). Treatment of tuberculosis with short-course, thrice-weekly, supervised therapy in the setting of a developing country is highly efficacious in both HIV-seropositive and -seronegative patients.

PMID:
8887603
DOI:
10.1164/ajrccm.154.4.8887603
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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