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Phys Ther. 1996 Oct;76(10):1066-81.

Lumbar lordosis and pelvic inclination of asymptomatic adults.

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1
Physical Therapy Program, Mayo School of Health-Related Sciences, Rochester, MN 055905, USA. youdas.james@mayo.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

We examined the association between pelvic inclination and lumbar lordosis during relaxed standing and eight variables thought to contribute to lordosis.

SUBJECTS:

Ninety subjects (45 men, 45 women) without back pain or a history of surgery were examined. The mean age was 54.8 years (SD = 8.5) for male subjects and 58.9 years (SD = 8.8) for female subjects.

METHODS:

Multiple linear regression modeling was used to assess the association of pelvic inclination and size of lumbar lordosis in a standing position with age, gender, body mass index, physical activity level, back and one-joint hip flexor muscle length, and performance and length of abdominal muscles.

RESULTS:

Abdominal muscle performance was associated with angle of pelvic inclination for women (R2 = .23), but not for men. Standing lumbar lordosis was associated with abdominal muscle length in women (R2 = .40), but it was multivariately associated with length of abdominal and one-joint hip flexor muscles and physical activity level in men (R2 = .38). No correlation was found between angle of pelvic inclination and depth of lumbar lordosis in a standing position.

CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION:

Neither univariate nor multivariate regression models account for variability in the angle of pelvic inclination or size of lumbar lordosis in adults during upright stance; no correlation was found in standing between these two variables. The use of abdominal muscle strengthening exercises or stretching exercises of the back and one-joint hip flexor muscles to correct faulty standing posture should be questioned.

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PMID:
8863760
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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