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Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):121-7.

Effect of low dietary calcium intake on blood pressure and pressure natriuresis response in rats: a possible role of the renin-angiotensin system.

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1
Second Department of Internal Medicine, Kagawa Medical School, Japan.

Abstract

Dietary Ca is an important modulator of blood pressure in humans and rats. Since the kidney plays a key role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the effects of a low Ca diet (0.01% Ca) on blood pressure and pressure natriuresis response were studied in normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, a possible role of the renin-angiotensin system in the development of hypertension and an altered pressure natriuresis response resulting from low dietary Ca intake was examined. In the low Ca diet group, systolic blood pressure measured by the tail-cuff method was significantly higher than in the normal Ca diet group (1,1% Ca) 1 week after the diet (1 13.0 +/- 7.1 vs. 105.0 +/- 9.5mmHg, p < 0.05). After 4 weeks, the hypertension was more pronounced. Low dietary Ca intake significantly inhibited the water and sodium excretory responses to acute elevation of renal perfusion pressure by tightening an infrarenal aortic constriction. Treatment with an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme, captopril (30 mg/kg/day), completely abolished the elevation of blood pressure and attenuated the reduced pressure natriuresis response observed in Ca-deficient rats. Although plasma renin activity was not different between the low and normal Ca diet groups after the 2-week dietary regimen, the pressor response to angiotensin II was enhanced by 30% in the low Ca diet group and there was a significant difference in the pressor response between the two groups. These results suggest a possible involvement of the renin-angiotensin system in the development of hypertension and an inhibitory effect on the pressure natriuresis response caused by low dietary Ca intake, via an enhanced sensitivity to angiotensin II.

PMID:
8860101
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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