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Diabetologia. 1996 Aug;39(8):993-6.

Insulin increases plasma leptin concentrations in normal subjects and patients with NIDDM.

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1
Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.

Abstract

Insulin is known to increase expression of the ob gene product leptin in adipose tissue of rodents. We determined whether insulin increases circulating leptin concentrations in humans, and whether this effect might be altered in patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Plasma leptin concentrations were determined during an 8.5-h hyperinsulinaemic clamp (serum free insulin approximately 480 pmol/l) and during an 8.5-h infusion of physiological NaCl solution (saline) in eight normal subjects (age 51 +/- 3 years, BMI 26.3 +/- 0.6 kg/m2, fasting plasma glucose 5.6 +/- 0.2 mmol/l) and seven patients with NIDDM (age 54 +/- 2 years, 27.0 +/- 0.9 kg/m2, 11.1 +/- 0.8 mmol/l). Fasting serum insulin level correlated with plasma leptin (r = 0.72, p < 0.005), even after adjusting for the percentage of body fat (p < 0.005). During the insulin infusion, a significant increase in the plasma leptin concentration was observed after 6 h (37 +/- 14%; 5.2 +/- 0.8. vs 3.9 +/- 0.6 ng/ml, 6 vs 0 h, p < 0.05) in the normal subjects and after 8.5 h (38 +/- 11%; 7.1 +/- 1.0 vs 5.5 +/- 0.9 ng/ml, 8.5 vs 0 h, p < 0.05) in the patients with NIDDM. During the saline infusion, plasma leptin concentrations decreased significantly in the normal subjects by 11 +/- 1% (p < 0.005) and in the patients with NIDDM by 14 +/- 1% (p < 0.01) after 2 h. During the infusion of insulin as compared to saline, plasma leptin concentrations were 32 +/- 13 (p < 0.05), 53 +/- 14 (p < 0.001), 106 +/- 15 (p < 0.001) and 165 +/- 21 (p < 0.001) % higher at 2, 4, 6 and 8.5 h in the normal subjects, and 11 +/- 9 (p < 0.05), 27 +/- 10 (p < 0.05), 58 +/- 7 (p < 0.001) and 106 +/- 13 (p < 0.001) % higher in the patients with NIDDM, respectively. No differences were observed in plasma leptin concentrations between the normal subjects and patients with NIDDM, under any conditions. We conclude that prolonged exposure to insulin increases plasma leptin concentrations in humans implying a role for insulin in chronic but not acute regulation of plasma leptin concentrations. The decrease in plasma leptin concentrations during saline infusion was greater than that expected on the basis of change in serum insulin concentrations, suggesting that factors other than insulin also contribute to regulation of plasma leptin concentrations.

PMID:
8858224
DOI:
10.1007/bf00403921
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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