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Diabet Med. 1995 Oct;12(10):916-20.

Neutrophil bactericidal function in diabetes mellitus: evidence for association with blood glucose control.

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  • 1University Department of Medicine, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, UK.

Abstract

Neutrophil bactericidal activity was assessed in patients with type 1 (n = 45) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 68) and non-diabetic control subjects (n = 40) by measurement of whole blood chemiluminescence. Though chemiluminescence values tended to be highest in the non-diabetic subjects these differences were not statistically significant (mean +/- SD) (2.73 +/- 1.65 mV (controls), 2.33 +/- 1.41 mV (Type 1 diabetes) and 2.38 +/- 1.12 mv (Type 2 diabetes), F = 1.12, p = 0.33). Significant negative correlations were evident, however, in patients with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes between chemiluminescence and glycated haemoglobin (rs = -0.35, p = 0.005 (Type 1), rs = -0.45, p = 0.002 (Type 2), fructosamine (rs = -0.36, p = 0.003 (Type 1), r = -0.42, p = 0.004 (Type 2)), and random blood glucose (rs 0 -0.25, p = 0.04 (Type 1), rs = -0.48, p = 0.001 (Type 2)). Changes in whole blood chemiluminescence in a further group of 10 patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus commenced on insulin therapy were followed for 21 days. Serum fructosamine concentrations fell significantly over this time (524 +/- 58 mumol l-1 to 405 +/- 47 mumol l-1, p < 0.001), however, although chemiluminescence values tended to rise these changes were not statistically significant (1.01 +/- 0.38 mV to 1.60 +/- 0.91 mV, S = 4.24, df = 5, p = 0.52). These results suggested that impaired neutrophil bactericidal function is associated with poor blood glucose control. While it is likely that neutrophil bactericidal function will improve as blood glucose control improves, further studies are required both to confirm this and to demonstrate a reduction in the incidence of clinical bacterial infection.

PMID:
8846684
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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