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Annu Rev Nutr. 1996;16:33-50.

Antioxidants in human health and disease.

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1
Pharmacology Group, King's College, University of London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Free radicals and antioxidants are widely discussed in the clinical and nutritional literature. Antioxidants are needed to prevent the formation and oppose the actions of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which are generated in vivo and cause damage to DNA, lipids, proteins, and other biomolecules. Endogenous antioxidant defenses (superoxide dismutases, H2O2-removing enzymes, metal binding proteins) are inadequate to prevent damage completely, so diet-derived antioxidants are important in maintaining health. Many dietary compounds have been suggested to be important antioxidants: The evidence for a key role of vitamins E and C is strong, but that for carotenoids and related plant pigments is weaker. Interest is also growing in the role of plant phenolics, especially flavonoids. Some antioxidants can exert prooxidant effects in vitro, but their physiological relevance is uncertain. Experimental approaches to the optimization of antioxidant nutrient intake are proposed.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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