Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Clin Nutr. 1996 Oct;64(4):587-93.

Plasma total homocysteine in healthy subjects: sex-specific relation with biological traits.

Author information

1
Hyperlipidemia and Atherosclerosis Research Group, Hôtel-Dieu Hospital, Montreal, Canada. cacans@ircm.umontreal.ca

Abstract

Fasting plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentration was measured in 380 men and 204 women selected for health on the basis of clinical history, physical examination, and normal results of a biochemical profile. We sought to define tHcy reference values in healthy individuals and to determine relations between tHcy and plasma folic acid, vitamin B-12, and pyridoxal phosphate (vitamin B-6) concentrations. Men had significantly higher plasma tHcy than women (9.7 +/- 4.9 compared with 7.6 +/- 4.1 mumol/L, x +/- SD) and lower folate concentrations (8.6 +/- 5.2 compared with 9.8 +/- 6.6 nmol/L, P < 0.05). Significant correlations were found between tHcy and uric acid, creatinine, albumin, folate, and vitamin B-12 concentrations. There was no correlation with age, body mass index, blood pressure, glucose, and total and lipoprotein lipids. When divided in quartiles of vitamin concentrations, subjects with the lowest vitamin B-12 and folate values had significantly higher tHcy concentrations than those in the other three quartiles. Interestingly, after exclusion of subjects in the lowest quartiles of folate and vitamin B-12 concentration, correlations between tHcy and vitamin concentrations were no longer observed, except for vitamin B-12 in men. Stepwise-multiple-regression analyses showed that the sex-specific influence of biological variables on tHcy concentrations was twice as important in healthy women than in healthy men. This study emphasizes the significance of sex-associated differences in the biology of homocysteine and underlines the importance of considering these in the determination of threshold values.

PMID:
8839504
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center