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Dis Colon Rectum. 1996 Oct;39(10 Suppl):S1-6.

Laparoscopic resection for diverticular disease.

Author information

1
Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Lahey Hitchcock Medical Center, Burlington, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The role of laparoscopic surgery in treatment of patients with diverticulitis is unclear. A retrospective comparison of laparoscopic with conventional surgery for patients with chronic diverticulitis was performed to assess morbidity, recovery from surgery, and cost.

METHODS:

Records of patients undergoing elective resection for uncomplicated diverticulitis from 1992 to 1994 at a single institution were reviewed. Laparoscopic resection involved complete intracorporeal dissection, bowel division, and anastomosis with extracorporeal placement of an anvil.

RESULTS:

Sigmoid and left colon resections were performed laparoscopically in 25 patients and by open technique in 17 patients by two independent operating teams. No significant differences existed in age, gender, weight, comorbidities, or operations performed. In the laparoscopic group, three operations were converted to open laparotomy (12 percent) because of unclear anatomy. Major complications occurred in two patients who underwent laparoscopic resection, both requiring laparotomy, and in one patient in the conventional surgery group who underwent computed tomographic-guided drainage of an abscess. Patients who underwent laparoscopic resection tolerated a regular diet sooner than patients who underwent conventional surgery (3.2 +/- 0.9 vs. 5.7 +/- 1.1 days; P < 0.001) and were discharged from the hospital earlier (4.2 +/- 1.1 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.1 days; P < 0.001). Overall costs were higher in the laparoscopic group than the open surgery group ($10,230 +/- 49.1 vs. $7,068 +/- 37.1; P < 0.001) because of a significantly longer total operating room time (397 +/- 9.1 vs. 115 +/- 5.1 min; P < 0.001). Follow-up studies with a mean of one year revealed two port site infections in the laparoscopic group and one wound infection in the open group. Of patients undergoing conventional resection, one patient experienced a postoperative bowel obstruction that was managed nonoperatively, and, in one patient, an incarcerated incisional hernia developed that required urgent laparotomy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Laparoscopic resection in patients with chronic diverticulitis is safe, with faster recovery and shorter hospital stay compared with conventional open surgery. Higher cost of operating room usage time makes the laparoscopic technique difficult to justify economically. Simplification of operating room use and better case selection may improve cost-effectiveness of the laparoscopic approach.

PMID:
8831539
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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