Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1996 Jul 1;21(13):1513-7.

Positions of dorsal root ganglia in the cervical spine. An anatomic and clinical study.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukushima Medical College, Japan.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

The authors investigated the positions of dorsal root ganglia and the relation of the location to symptoms and to the effects of nerve root infiltration in the cervical spine anatomically and clinically.

OBJECTIVES:

To clarify normal variation of positions of dorsal root ganglia and the relation of the location of dorsal root ganglia to symptoms and to the effects of nerve root infiltration.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

The dorsal root ganglia of the spinal nerve has attracted much attention as an important structure in the mechanisms of radicular symptoms in the lumbar spine. Although the position of the dorsal root ganglia in the lumbar spine has been classified recently, there are few reports regarding the dorsal root ganglia in the cervical spine.

METHODS:

The positions of dorsal root ganglia were divided into two types: proximally situated and distally situated. The positions of dorsal root ganglia in the anatomic and clinical cases were compared. The relation of the positions of dorsal root ganglia to symptoms and to the clinical effects of nerve root infiltration were analyzed.

RESULTS:

There was no statistically significant difference in positions of dorsal root ganglia in C6 nerve roots between anatomic and clinical cases. In addition, there was no relation between symptoms and the positions of dorsal root ganglia in clinical cases. However, there was a significant difference in positions of dorsal root ganglia in C7 nerve roots between anatomic and clinical cases. Nerve root infiltration was significantly more effective in the distally situated type of dorsal root ganglia.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study defined the normal variation of the positions of dorsal root ganglia. The results strongly suggest that some attention should be paid to the position of dorsal root ganglia in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical radiculopathy.

PMID:
8817777
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center