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Ubiquinone supplementation and exercise capacity in trained young and older men.

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1
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

It has been suggested that ubiquinone improves exercise performance and antioxidant capacity. We studied the effects of ubiquinone supplementation (120 mg.day-1 for 6 weeks) on aerobic capacity and lipid peroxidation during exercise in 11 young (aged 22-38 years) and 8 older (aged 60-74 years), trained men. The cross-over study was double-blind and placebo-controlled. Serum ubiquinone concentration increased after supplementation (P < 0.0001 for treatment) in both age groups. The maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was measured using a direct incremental ergometer test. In the young subjects, the VO2max after placebo and ubiquinone treatment was 58.5 (95% confidence interval: 53.0-64.0) and 59.0 ml.min-1.kg-1 (52.2-66.8), respectively. The corresponding results in the older subjects were: 37.2 (31.7-42.7) and 33.7 ml.min-1.kg-1 (26.2-41.7) (P < 0.0001 for age group, P > 0.05 for treatment). In a prolonged test (60-min submaximal, then incremental load until exhaustion) time to exhaustion was longer after the placebo [young men: 85.7 (82.4-89.0), older men: 82.9 min (75.8-89.9)] than after ubiquinone [young men: 82.1 (78.5-85.8), older men: 77.2 min (70.1-83.7); P = 0.0003 for treatment]. Neither ubiquinone supplementation nor exercise affected serum malondialdehyde concentration. Oral ubiquinone was ineffective as an ergogenic aid in both the young and older, trained men.

PMID:
8789577
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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