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Gastrointest Endosc. 1996 Jun;43(6):580-3.

Push enteroscopic cauterization: long-term follow-up of 83 patients with bleeding small intestinal angiodysplasia.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study assessed the long-term effectiveness of push enteroscopic cauterization of bleeding intestinal angiodysplasia.

METHODS:

We retrospectively reviewed the clinical course of patients who underwent push and sonde enteroscopy for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and were diagnosed with intestinal angiodysplasias.

RESULTS:

One hundred twelve patients bleeding from small intestinal angiodysplasias were identified. After excluding those lost to follow-up (29), data were collected from 83 patients. Fifty-five patients (29 men; mean age, 73 years; mean units of packed red blood cells transfused, 21.4; average bleeding history, 22 months) were cauterized. Twenty-eight patients (12 men; mean age, 71; mean units of packed red blood cells transfused, 15.8; average bleeding history, 22 months) were not cauterized. The noncauterized group (follow-up, 26 +/- 14 months; mean +/- SD) continued to bleed, requiring 2.16 +/- 3.86 units of packed red blood cells transfused per month (units/month) before and 0.97 +/- 1.46 units/month after diagnosis (NS). The cauterized group (follow-up, 30 +/- 18 months) significantly improved, requiring 2.40 +/- 2.97 units/month before treatment and 0.32 +/- 0.91 units/month after cauterization (p < 0.0001, paired t test).

CONCLUSION:

Cauterization of endoscopically accessible small intestinal angiodysplasias may decrease rebleeding.

PMID:
8781937
DOI:
10.1016/s0016-5107(96)70195-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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