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Am J Clin Nutr. 1996 Sep;64(3):312-8.

Neither raw nor retrograded resistant starch lowers fasting serum cholesterol concentrations in healthy normolipidemic subjects.

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  • 1Department of Human Nutrition, Wageningen Agricultural University, Netherlands. marie-louise heijnen@etl.voed.wau.nl

Abstract

The question addressed was whether dietary resistant starch would lower serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations in healthy normolipidemic subjects. In a randomized single-blind 3 x 3 Latin-square study with corrections for any carryover effects, 27 males and 30 females consumed supplements containing glucose or resistant starch (RS) from raw high-amylose cornstarch (RS2) or from retrograded high-amylose cornstarch (RS3). The RS2 and RS3 supplements provided 30 g RS/d. Each type of supplement was consumed in addition to the habitual diet for 3 wk. At the end of each 3-wk period, fasting blood samples and a 24-h food-consumption recall were obtained from each subject. The subjects collected 24-h urine samples for lithium determination, which was added to the supplements to check compliance. Mean lithium recovery was 97% and did not differ between supplements. The mean composition of the background diet was similar when the three supplements were taken. Body weight remained constant throughout the study. There were no significant differences in the fasting concentrations of serum total, high-density-lipoprotein (HDL), and low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; triacylglycerols, or 3 alpha-hydroxy bile acids after consumption of glucose, RS2, or RS3. Evidence is presented that the lack of effect of RS2 and RS3 on serum lipid concentrations cannot be explained by insufficient statistical power, a low dose, or a short duration of treatment. The subjects reported softer stools and more gastrointestinal symptoms after supplementation with RS than after glucose. Neither the RS2 nor the RS3 supplements lowered serum lipid concentrations in healthy, normolipidemic men and women.

PMID:
8780339
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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