Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Tissue Res. 1996 Jul;285(1):75-82.

The effects of soft-water acclimation on gill structure in the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5.

Abstract

Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to ion-poor (soft) water to test the hypothesis that naturally induced proliferation of branchial chloride cells causes a thickening of the blood-to-water diffusion barrier. This was achieved by using a combination of scanning and transmission electron-microscopic techniques. Fish were exposed to soft-water conditions ([Na+]= 0.055 mmol l-1, [Cl-] approximately 0.029 mmol 1(-1), [Ca2+] approximately 0.059 mmol 1(-1), and [K+] approximately 0.007 mmol 1(-1)) for 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Marked chloride cell proliferation was evident at all sampling times with an approximate doubling of the gill epithelial surface area covered by chloride cells exposed to the water ("chloride cell fractional area"). The increases in chloride cell fractional area resulted from both increased numbers of cells and expanded apical surfaces of exposed individual cells. As a result of chloride cell proliferation, soft-water exposure was associated with a doubling of the lamellar blood-to-water diffusion distance from 3.26+/-0.08 microM to 6.58+/-0.43 microM as determined from transmission electron micrographs. These data demonstrated a positive correlation between chloride cell fractional area and blood-to-water diffusion distance. We conclude that, in trout, chloride cell proliferation during soft-water exposure, while presumably benefiting ionic regulation, may impair gas transfer owing to the associated thickening of the blood-to-water diffusion barrier.

PMID:
8766860
DOI:
10.1007/s004410050622
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center