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Gastroenterol Clin Biol. 1996;20(4):339-45.

[Treatment of common bile duct lithiasis under laparoscopy. A prospective multicenter study in 189 patients].

[Article in French]

Author information

  • 1Départment de Chirurgie Digestive A, Hôpital Saint-Eloi, Montpellier.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and results of common bile duct laparoscopic treatment and exploration in patients with choledocholithiasis.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

From November 1991 to December 1994, 189 consecutive malades (120 females; mean age 68 years, range: 21-92) with choledocholithiasis identified during routine intraoperative cholangiogram underwent surgical exploration of common bile duct in 5 surgical centers. Twenty patients were referred to surgery after unsuccessful endoscopic sphincterotomy.

RESULTS:

Following laparoscopic exploration and intraoperative cholangiography, common bile duct stone extraction by laparoscopy was not attempted in 11 patients (5.8%). The common bile duct was successfully cleared of all stones in 153 patients (81% of the overall population and 86% of laparoscopic attempts), either via the transcystic route (n = 97) or through choledocotomy (n = 56). Eighteen patients required conversion to open surgery, 16 for unsuccessful stone extraction and 2 despite successful stone extraction. Postoperative endoscopic sphincterotomy was required in 7 patients (4.4%) for retained stones after laparoscopic treatment. There were no postoperative deaths (95% confidence interval 0-1.6%), and follow-up, ranging from 3 to 42 months, has shown no further clinical evidence of retained stones.

CONCLUSION:

Diagnosis and treatment of common bile duct stones is feasible by laparoscopy, and the results in this series compare favorably with those of conventional surgical treatment. Complete treatment of biliary lithiasis, in one operation, avoids the pitfalls of patient selection for preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and the risks of endoscopic sphincterotomy.

PMID:
8758499
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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