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J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1996 Aug;35(8):1009-17.

Quantitative EEG differences in a nonclinical sample of children with ADHD and undifferentiated ADD.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To use quantitative electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques to identify electrophysiological differences between children with distinct disorders of attention and/or hyperactivity.

METHOD:

Forty children from a prescreened community sample were evaluated by means of both spectral EEG and evoked response potential (ERP) techniques. The children were 7 to 13 years of age and were selected on the basis of membership in one of the following DSM-III-R categories: attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (n = 16), undifferentiated attention deficit disorder (UADD) (n = 12), or no disruptive disorder diagnosis (n = 12).

RESULTS:

Spectral EEG revealed that UADD subjects had less delta band relative percent power (RPP) (p < .01), more beta band RPP (p < .01), and ERP findings of a decreased rare tone P300 amplitude (p < .02) compared with the control group. ADHD subjects had spectral EEG findings of increased beta band RPP (p < .05) and ERP findings of an increased common tone N100 latency (p < .02) and a decreased rare tone P300 amplitude (p < .02). Interhemispheric asymmetries appeared to distinguish the groups: the UADD group had spectral EEG asymmetries; the ADHD group had only ERP asymmetries; and the control group had no asymmetries.

CONCLUSION:

Quantitative EEG techniques may prove useful in differentiating specific subtypes of ADHD.

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[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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