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J Neurosurg. 1996 Sep;85(3):403-9.

Hospital resource utilization in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

Abstract

The authors reviewed clinical and financial data for all patients treated for nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and unruptured cerebral aneurysms at their institution between June 1993 and December 1994. This study sought to identify specific areas of high resource utilization that may be amenable to reduction of expenditures without compromising quality of care. Detailed hospital financial data were correlated with clinical grade and course. Areas of high resource use were identified based on patient charges and category-specific loaded hospital cost. Patients were divided into four groups: Group 1, surgically treated unruptured aneurysms (28 patients); Group 2, acute SAH (42 patients); Group 3, SAH with vasospasm (32 patients); and Group 4, SAH with negative angiogram (10 patients). Total cost per patient (mean +/- standard deviation in thousands of U.S. dollars) was highest for Group 3 (38.4 +/- 21.3; vs. Group 1, 12.7 +/- 8.8; Group 2, 22.6 +/- 20.9; and Group 4, 25.0 +/- 33.5) and correlated with hospital length of stay, Hunt and Hess grade, and Fisher grade. Areas of highest hospital cost were not always reflected in patient charges. The three areas of highest cost accounted for 48.5% of the total cost and were: 1) intensive care unit (ICU) room (Group 1, 2.5 +/- 3.5; Group 2, 7.0 +/- 9.2; Group 3, 11.0 +/- 7.8; and Group 4, 7.9 +/- 14.1); 2) arteriography (Group 1, 1.7 +/- 1.2; Group 2, 2.1 +/- 1.5; Group 3, 4.1 +/- 2.1; and Group 4, 2.2 +/- 0.7); and 3) ICU medicosurgical supplies (Group 1, 1.7 +/- 0.8; Group 2, 2.0 +/- 1.5; Group 3, 3.7 +/- 1.7; and Group 4, 2.0 +/- 3.0). It is concluded that cost containment strategies should be based on cost rather than charge and novel approaches will be required to reduce the cost of treating patients with SAH. Such approaches might include preventing vasospasm, reducing ICU stay, selective use of arteriography, and reducing the cost of supplies.

PMID:
8751624
DOI:
10.3171/jns.1996.85.3.0403
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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