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Microb Pathog. 1996 Apr;20(4):235-46.

Studies into the role of the SEF14 fimbrial antigen in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enteritidis.

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1
Central Veterinary Laboratory, Addlestone, Surrey, UK.

Abstract

To investigate the role of the SEF14 fimbrial antigen in pathogenesis, a single defined sefA (SEF14-) inactivated mutant of Salmonella enteritidis strain LA5 was constructed and tested in a number of biological assay systems. There was no significant difference between the wild-type strain and the isogenic SEF14- mutant in their abilities to adhere to and invade HEp-2 epithelial cells or their survival in mouse peritoneal macrophages, whereas the SEF14- mutant was ingested more rapidly by isolated human PMN. Both the strains colonized the intestine, invaded and spread systemically in 1 day-old chicks, laying hens and BALB/c mice equally well. A significantly greater number of chicks excreted the wild-type SEF14+ strain during the first week following infection as compared to those infected with the SEF14- mutant. However, similar numbers of chicks excreted the two strains between 2 and 7 weeks after infection. These results indicate that possession of SEF14 fimbriae alone do not appear to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of S. enteritidis although its contribution to virulence may be dependent on the host species infected.

PMID:
8737493
DOI:
10.1006/mpat.1996.0022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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