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Neuroscience. 1996 Jun;72(4):1073-82.

The action of oxytocin originating in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus on mitral and granule cells in the rat main olfactory bulb.

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1
Department of Physiology, Kochi Medical School, Japan.

Abstract

The effects of electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus paraventricular nucleus on the spontaneous firing of mitral and granule cells in the main olfactory bulb were examined in ovariectomized female rats under urethane anaesthesia. High-frequency stimulation (0.5-1.0 mA, 10-20 pulses at 100 Hz) of the paraventricular nucleus produced inhibitory responses in 80% of mitral cells tested and excitatory responses in 74% of granule cells tested, with latencies ranging from 2 to 150 s. Both responses were blocked by infusions into the olfactory bulb of [d(CH2)5, Tyr(Me)2]ornithine-vasotocin (10 pmol), an oxytocin antagonist, and mimicked by intracerebroventricular infusions (0.2 or 0.4 nmol) or microiontophoretic applications of oxytocin but not by intracerebroventricular infusions of vasopressin (1 or 2 nmol). Infusions of 0.5% lignocaine, a local anaesthetic, into either the medial olfactory tract or the medial forebrain bundle failed to block the responses of mitral and granule cells to the stimulation. Unilateral transections at various levels between the bulb and the paraventricular nucleus also failed to block the responses. There were cases in which significant responses of mitral and granule cells to the stimulation required 60 or more pulses after the lignocaine infusions or transections, however. These results suggest that oxytocin originating in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus reaches the olfactory bulb following its release partly into the cerebrospinal fluid and acts to decrease olfactory processing.

PMID:
8735230
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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