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Diabetes Care. 1995 Dec;18(12):1527-33.

Pregnancy outcomes in women without gestational diabetes mellitus related to the maternal glucose level. Is there a continuum of risk?

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  • 1Illawarra Area Health Service and the University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine selected pregnancy outcomes in women without gestational diabetes mellitus to see whether there was a continuum of risk related to the maternal glucose level.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Consecutive women attending two prenatal clinics and three obstetricians in private practice were tested for GDM at the beginning of the third trimester using a 75-g glucose load in the fasting state. The rate of induction, the number of assisted deliveries, the presence of pregnancy-induced hypertension, fetal birth weights, and morbidity were examined with respect to the maternal 2-h glucose level.

RESULTS:

Data were available for 1,441 women with a 2-h glucose level < 8.0 mmol/l (144 mg/dl). For each 1.0 mmol/l (18 mg/dl) increase in the glucose level, the odds in favor of an assisted delivery increased by 15.2%, and the odds in favor of the baby being admitted to a special care nursery (SCN) increased by 22.6%. There was no significant association between maternal glucose levels and the probability of either pregnancy-induced hypertension or a large-for-gestational-age (LGA) baby after adjustment for other variables.

CONCLUSIONS:

In normal women there is a continuum of risk related to the maternal glucose level 2 h after a glucose tolerance test for the probability of having an assisted delivery and the likelihood of the baby being admitted to an SCN. The chance of having pregnancy-induced hypertension or a LGA baby also increased as the maternal glucose level increased but could be largely explained by an increasing body mass index.

PMID:
8722047
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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