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Diabetes Care. 1995 Oct;18(10):1341-6.

Probucol normalizes cholesteryl ester transfer in IDDM.

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1
Department of Medicine, Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Cholesteryl ester transfer (CET) is pathologically increased in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), and the resulting enrichment of the apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins with cholesteryl ester (CE) is believed to increase their atherogenicity. Because we have shown previously that treatment with the lipid-modifying antioxidant probucol normalizes CET in nondiabetic patients with hypercholesterolemia, we sought to determine whether the same beneficial effects could be achieved in IDDM.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

CET was measured by both mass and isotopic assay in eight normolipidemic (triglyceride, 102; cholesterol, 192; high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, 45 mg/dl) IDDM patients (fructosamine 495 +/- 146 mumol/l; normal 174-286) before and after 2 months of treatment with probucol (1.0 g/day).

RESULTS:

Before treatment, CET was accelerated abnormally (P < 0.001). As expected, probucol decreased plasma (-13%; P < 0.025) and HDL2 cholesterol levels (-52%; P < 0.025) and the concentration of lipoprotein A-I particles (P < 0.025). In conjunction with these changes, CET fell dramatically in all subjects (mass assay: -94%; isotopic assay: -22%, P < 0.001) with no change in the mass of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) (pretreatment 2.91 +/- 0.97 vs. posttreatment 3.21 +/- 1.03 micrograms/ml). Glycemic control, however, improved significantly (fructosamine 409 +/- 85 mumol/l, P < 0.025).

CONCLUSIONS:

Because it is believed that accelerated CET promotes the formation of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins enriched with atherogenic CE, the capacity of probucol to reverse this functional abnormality without adversely affecting glycemic control suggests that it has a place in the therapy of IDDM.

PMID:
8721935
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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