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Lancet. 1996 Jul 20;348(9021):159-61.

Decreased cerebrospinal-fluid/serum leptin ratio in obesity: a possible mechanism for leptin resistance.

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1
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A receptor for leptin has been cloned from the choroid plexus, the site of cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) production and the location of the blood/cerebrospinal-fluid barrier. Thus, this receptor might serve as a transporter for leptin. We have studied leptin concentrations in serum and (CSF).

METHODS AND FINDINGS:

We demonstrated by radioimmunoassay and western blot the presence of leptin in human CSF. We then measured leptin in CSF and serum in 31 individuals with a wide range of bodyweight. Mean serum leptin was 318% higher in 8 obese (40.2 [SE 8.6] ng/mL) than in 23 lean individuals (9.6 [1.5] ng/mL, p < 0.0005). However, the CSF leptin concentration in obese individuals (0.337 [0.04] ng/mL) was only 30% higher than in lean people (0.259 [0.26] ng/mL, p < 0.1). Consequently, the leptin CSF/serum ratio in lean individuals (0.047 [0.010]) was 4.3-fold higher than that in obese individuals (0.011 [0.002], p < 0.05). The relation between CSF leptin and serum leptin was best described by a logarithmic function (r = 0 x 52, p < 0.01).

INTERPRETATION:

Our data suggest that leptin enters the brain by a saturable transport system. The capacity of leptin transport is lower in obese individuals, and may provide a mechanism for leptin resistance.

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PMID:
8684156
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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