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J Urol. 1996 Jul;156(1):49-54; discussion 54-5.

Ancillary techniques in the followup of transitional cell carcinoma: a comparison of cytology, histology and deoxyribonucleic acid image analysis cytometry in 91 patients.

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1
Department of Pathology, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa 33612, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Voided urine and bladder washing cytology are used frequently in the evaluation of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. As part of an ongoing investigation we report on the role of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) image analysis cytometry as an adjunct to cytology in the followup of patients with transitional cell carcinoma.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Urine cytology and image analysis cytometry were performed independently on aliquots of voided urine, catheterized urine or bladder washings from 91 patients with previous or active transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, and the results were compared to those of concurrent biopsy and clinical followup.

RESULTS:

Of 75 recurrent transitional cell carcinomas 42 were detected by cytology, while 63 and 64 were identified by image analysis cytometry and biopsy, respectively, for a sensitivity of 57, 84 and 85%, respectively. Combined cytology and image analysis cytometry detected 67 recurrences, for an overall sensitivity of 89%. Of 11 cases undetected by concurrent biopsy 9 had abnormal DNA histograms with transitional cell carcinoma at followup and 2 were DNA diploid but with grade 1 transitional cell carcinoma at followup. Of 12 cases undetected by image analysis cytometry 8 were grade 1 and 4 were grade 2 transitional cell carcinoma.

CONCLUSIONS:

Urine cytology and image analysis cytometry detect most recurrent tumors. Their combined use is indicated in the followup of patients with bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

PMID:
8648836
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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