Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
N Engl J Med. 1996 Jul 4;335(1):8-15.

Stroke in users of low-dose oral contraceptives.

Author information

1
Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, Southern California, Pasadena, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have linked the use of oral contraceptive agents to an increased risk of stroke, but those studies have been limited to oral contraceptives containing more estrogen than is now generally used.

METHODS:

In a population-based, case-control study, we identified fatal and nonfatal strokes in female members of the California Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program and who were 15 through 44 years of age. Matched controls were randomly selected from female members who had not had strokes. Information about the use of oral contraceptives (essentially limited to low-estrogen preparations) was obtained in interviews.

RESULTS:

A total of 408 confirmed strokes occurred in a total of 1.1 million women during 3.6 million woman-years of observation. The incidence of stroke was thus 11.3 per 100,000 woman-years. On the basis of data from 295 women with stroke who were interviewed and their controls, the odds ratio for ischemic stroke among current users of oral contraceptives, as compared with former users and women who had never used such drugs, was 1.18 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.54 to 2.59) after adjustment for other risk factors for stroke. The adjusted odds ratio for hemorrhagic stroke was 1.14 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.60 to 2.16). With respect to the risk of hemorrhagic stroke, there was a positive interaction between the current use of oral contraceptives and smoking (odds ratio for women with both these factors, 3.64; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.95 to 13.87).

CONCLUSIONS:

Stroke is rare among women of childbearing age. Low-estrogen oral-contraceptive preparations do not appear to increase the risk of stroke.

PIP:

Previous studies have linked the use of oral contraceptive agents to an increased risk of stroke, but those studies have been limited to oral contraceptives containing more estrogen than is now generally used. In a population-based, case-control study, the authors identified fatal and nonfatal strokes in female members of the California Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program who were 15-44 years of age. Matched controls were randomly selected from female members who had not had strokes. Information about the use of oral contraceptives (essentially limited to low-estrogen preparations) was obtained in interviews. A total of 408 confirmed strokes occurred in a total of 1.1 million women during 3.6 million woman-years of observation. The incidence of stroke was thus 11.3 per 100,000 woman-years. On the basis of data from 295 women with stroke who were interviewed and their controls, the odds ratio for ischemic stroke among current users of oral contraceptives, as compared with former users and women who had never used such drugs, was 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-2.59) after adjustment for other risk factors for stroke. The adjusted odds ratio for hemorrhagic stroke was 1.14 (95% CI, 0.60-2.16). With respect to the risk of hemorrhagic stroke, there was a positive interaction between the current use of oral contraceptives and smoking (odds ratio for women with both these factors, 3.64; 95% CI, 0.95-13.87). The authors conclude that stroke is rare among women of childbearing age and that low-estrogen oral contraceptive preparations do not appear to increase the risk of stroke.

PMID:
8637557
DOI:
10.1056/NEJM199607043350102
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center