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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1996 Apr;81(4):1449-53.

Increased circulating adrenomedullin, a novel vasodilatory peptide, in sepsis.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine II, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.

Abstract

Human adrenomedullin (hAM), a potent vasodilatory peptide originally identified in pheochromocytoma, has been shown to be present in various human tissues and circulate in human plasma. We measured plasma concentrations of immunoreactive hAM in patients with sepsis who had been admitted to intensive care unit (ICU). Plasma hAM concentrations in 12 septic patients upon entering the ICU were extremely elevated (107 +/- 139 fmol/ml: mean +/- SD) compared to those of 16 age-matched normal subjects (7.9 +/- 3 fmol/mL). Among 10 patients with normal renal function, plasma hAM levels either decreased or increased during the hospital course; the former group survived and the latter group succumbed. Two patients with acute renal failure had markedly elevated plasma hAM levels during the early course, which declined rapidly during the recovery course. High performance liquid chromatography of plasma extracts from one patient with acute renal failure revealed a single major component of immunoreactive hAM coeluting with authentic hAM (1-52) during acute and recovery phase. Plasma hAM concentration showed positive correlations with heart rate, right atrial pressure, and serum creatinine concentration, but not with other hemodynamic variables. These data suggest that a marked increase in circulating hAM in sepsis may be caused by its decreased clearance and/or its enhanced synthesis by multiple organ dysfunction, and that increased endogenous hAM may be involved in the mechanism of cardiovascular abnormalities associated with sepsis.

PMID:
8636349
DOI:
10.1210/jcem.81.4.8636349
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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