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Transplantation. 1996 May 27;61(10):1475-8.

Diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation: characteristics, outcome, and risk factors.

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1
Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France.

Abstract

The incidence and risk factors of posttransplant diabetes mellitus were evaluated in 1325 consecutive renal transplant recipients. Thirty-three (2.5%) patients developed diabetes mellitus requiring insulin therapy. Onset occurred a mean of 5.7 +/- 1.5 months following transplantation. The patients were compared with 33 paired-control kidney recipients. The patients were significantly older than the controls (46.8 +/- 1.9 vs. 40.6 +/- 2.1 years) (P<0.05), and chronic renal failure was more often related to interstitial nephritis (P<0.05). A family history of diabetes mellitus, the body mass index, ethnic origin, HLA phenotype, and the total doses of steroids and cyclosporine were similar in the two groups. The number of patients with at least one rejection episode was significantly higher among the diabetic patients (21 versus 9) but the number of episodes was similar. Diabetes occurred a mean of 1.1 +/- 0.3 months following rejection treatment. Intravenous pulsed prednisolone was always used for anti-rejection therapy. Insulin was withdrawn in 16 cases after a mean of 4 +/- 1 months, independently of steroid dosage reductions. Actuarial patient and graft survival rates were not significantly different, although 6-year outcome tended to be better in the controls (86% versus 93% for patient survival and 67% versus 93% for graft survival). This study suggests that pulsed steroid therapy might be the critical factor in the onset of posttransplant diabetes and that the risk is increased in older patients with chronic interstitial nephrititis.

PMID:
8633374
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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