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Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1996 Mar;103(3):273-80.

Diet in pregnancy and the offspring's blood pressure 40 years later.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Maternity Hospital.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine how diet of the mother in pregnancy influences the blood pressure of the offspring in adult life.

DESIGN:

A follow up study of men and women born during 1948-1954 whose mothers had taken part in a survey of diet in late pregnancy.

SETTING:

Aberdeen, Scotland.

POPULATION:

Two hundred and fifty-three men and women born in Aberdeen Maternity Hospital.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

RESULTS:

The relations between the diet of mothers and their offsprings' blood pressure were complex. When the mothers' intake of animal protein was less than 50 g daily, a higher carbohydrate intake was associated with a higher blood pressure in the offspring (a 100 g increase in carbohydrate being associated with a 3 mmHg increase in systolic pressure (P = 0.02)). At daily animal protein intakes above 50 g, lower carbohydrate intake was associated with higher blood pressure (a 100 g decrease in carbohydrate being associated with an 11 mmHg rise in systolic blood pressure (P = 0.004)). These increases in blood pressure were associated with decreased placental size.

CONCLUSION:

Mothers' intakes of animal protein and carbohydrate in late pregnancy may influence their offsprings' adult blood pressure. This may be mediated through effects on placental growth.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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