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Arthritis Rheum. 1996 Apr;39(4):671-6.

Antiribosomal P antibodies in pediatric patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and psychosis.

Author information

1
The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study antibodies directed against ribosomal P proteins, a sensitive and specific marker of depression and psychosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), in pediatric patients with SLE.

METHODS:

One hundred six serum samples were obtained from 79 patients with SLE. Sixty age- and sex-matched control sera were obtained, and 12 samples were obtained from children with primary psychosis. Antibodies to recombinant ribosomal P (rRP) protein were detected using a standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

RESULTS:

All 12 children with non-SLE-associated psychosis had normal levels of anti-rRP antibodies. Elevated levels of anti-rRP were found in 11 of 64 pediatric SLE patients without a history of psychosis (17%). In the group of 13 SLE patients with psychosis, 5 (38%) had increased anti-rRP antibody levels during the time of acute psychosis, and which significantly decreased during remission. In addition, most of the SLE patients without a history of psychosis had a good correlation between anti-rRP antibody levels and disease activity. The patients with psychosis had significantly less renal involvement than the patients without a history of psychosis. This apparent protection from renal disease was not related to the presence or absence of either antiribosomal P or anti-DNA antibodies.

CONCLUSION:

Elevated serum levels of antibodies to ribosomal P protein can distinguish SLE-associated psychosis from primary psychosis of childhood. In SLE, elevated antiribosomal P antibody levels were not specific for psychosis. Serial assays were useful for monitoring the disease activity.

PMID:
8630119
DOI:
10.1002/art.1780390420
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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