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J Urol. 1996 Jun;155(6):1847-51.

A prospective study of the intake of vitamins C and B6, and the risk of kidney stones in men.

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1
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The association between the intake of vitamins C and B6, and kidney stone formation was examined.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We conducted a prospective study of the relationship between the intake of vitamins C and B6 and the risk of symptomatic kidney stones in a cohort of 45,251 men 40 to 75 years old with no history of kidney calculi. Vitamin intake from foods and supplements was assessed using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire completed in 1986.

RESULTS:

During 6 years of followup 751 incident cases of kidney stones were documented. Neither vitamin C nor vitamin B6 intake was significantly associated with the risk of stone formation. For vitamin C the age-adjusted relative risk for men consuming 1,500 mg. daily or more compared to less than 250 mg. daily was 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.54 to 1.11). For vitamin B6 the age-adjusted relative risk for men consuming 40 mg. daily or more compared to less than 3 mg. daily was 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.31). After adjusting for other potential stone risk factors the relative risks did not change significantly.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data do not support an association between a high daily intake of vitamin C or vitamin B6 and the risk of stone formation, even when consumed in large doses.

PMID:
8618271
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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